Harrison Bergenson

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Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. is a story literally exaggerated to its limit by showing, in the near future, what it means to be equal in every way by having people not being able to show any form of intelligence or creativity whatsoever. When Harrison Bergeron breaks the chains of government oppression, he dies for his failed cause. He dies because he chooses not to conform to the rest of his oppressive society. His parents, George and Hazel, who are nothing more than two bodies under the government’s mind control, can do nothing to save their son or seek justice for his death. The story is not only a reflection of the author’s concern with controlling the masses through television, but is also an attack on the idea of enforced equality.


The theme of Harrison Bergeron is that wanting to be better than other people is a form of insanity that makes a person completely unable to ever be happy. The handicap general is the protagonist, she keeps everyone happy. Since Harrison and his ballerina are afflicted with the need to be superior, she must kill them to put them out of their misery. It is a theme of heroism and the virtues of a protective all powerful government.


Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut Jr. is a story literally exaggerated to its limit by showing, in the near future, what it means to be equal in every way by having people not being able to show any form of intelligence or creativity whatsoever. When Harrison Bergeron breaks the chains of government oppression, he dies for his failed cause. He dies because he chooses not to conform to the rest of his oppressive society. His parents, George and Hazel, who are nothing more than two bodies under the government’s mind control, can do nothing to save their son or seek justice for his death. The story is not only a reflection of the author’s concern with controlling the masses through television, but is also an attack on the idea of enforced equality.








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Inner Hate

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In “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister,” by Robert Browning, the narrator’s thoughts and feelings reveal him as a hypocrite, and he confesses his intense hatred and rage towards Brother Lawrence.


The first evidence of hatred is revealed in the first two lines. Gr-r-r -- there go my hearts abhorrence! / Water your damned flowerpots, do! The narrator growling like a wild animal shows his complete hatred of Brother Lawrence .The narrator has made it obvious that he loathes Brother Lawrence and begins to mock him. “What? Your myrtle-bush needs trimming? / Oh, that rose has prior claims-- /Needs its leaden vase filled brimming? / Hell dry you up with its flames!” The narrator‘s sentences are punctuated with a question mark, but he is asking in sarcasm, rather than in curiosity of his garden. This shows that his private thoughts differ than his private ones on account of being too cowardly to proclaim his hate for Brother Lawrence in public.


The narrator shows that his inner character is totally opposite than what a monk is supposed to portray. The narrator confirms his hatred and wishes damnation upon Brother Lawrence in the first paragraph.


These are not feelings a true monk should possess for any other human being. The narrator accuses Brother Lawrence of sin he has committed himself (5-). A man does not watch a grown woman bathe and describe it in such graphic detail unless he was lusting for her. A monk vows himself to celibacy, and it is clear in the Bible that lusting is a sin. This shows that the narrator is a hypocrite, considering he is going against everything he is supposed to represent as a monk. In the last stanza the narrator contemplates selling his own soul to Satan to assure Brother Lawrence’s damnation, if there was a way for him to slip his way out of the bargain (65-7). This confirms the narrator’s total and complete hatred and rage for Brother Lawrence, who to our knowledge has done no wrong, and is unaware of the narrator’s vicious attitude against him. The narrator’s private feelings contrasting with what he displays in public illustrate his hypocritical attitude because he pretends to be a holy monk in public, when his private thoughts are loathsome.








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hobbes and locke

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Hobbes vs Locke








Nowadays, especially after the terrorist acts on September 11, 001 and the war in








Iraq, terrorism is on-top issue discussion that turns the attention of the whole world. The





reason for that is that the nations are threatened for their security and safety. Constant





conflicts and wars keep people in tension. What should the government do for the national





security? I would like to contemplate on this question by looking at the theories of John





Locke and Thomas Hobbes.





Thomas Hobbes and John Locke are two political philosophers; their theories were





about the formation of the society and discussing the men in his natural state. Even though





they both believed that men naturally have to some extent equality and freedom, what makes





their concepts differ is the presence or absence of the natural law. While Hobbes’ position is





confined on the importance of security and that the government needs to have the power to





take any necessary step to maintain peace and to avoid war and conflict, Locke’s position is





comprehensive on the right of liberty and that the government’s role and purpose is to





conserve and to accord the liberty and freedom of every individual.





If we take a look at Hobbes’ theory about the natural state, that means the condition





men were in before political government came into existence, is that people are at constant





war, a war of all against all. In their nature, people are selfish and tend to do everything for





their own reason. Hobbes says that the natural reason is something that is inside the person





head and that the reason does not have power to establish the civilized relationships between,





people, thus the sovereign is needed as a tool to establish the civilization. He contends that if





there is not power to keep people in awe, they will continually be in war against each other.











Hobbes believed that without the ruler with the power, society would fall into the state of





nature. For this reason, the power of the sovereign must be absolute. Hobbes theory is based





on the fact that there is a law of nature, in nature, where everyone has almost equal power and





is as vulnerable as others, but even if it comes to killing each other; people have common





interest to preserve themselves from being vulnerable by any means. Hobbes stated that there





are the laws of nature which are dictated by the reason. One of them is that because the state





of war is unbearable, people should seek peace. Another law described by Hobbes, is that for





people to get into one society, the agreement should be made among them. The agreement can





be made naturally (as the society is formed by animals) or artificially. As human beings have





such revenge, like or dislike, the agreement should be made artificially. People should build a





common wealth to force themselves to live in peace. One person or the group of people is





given the power to protect the rest of the society submitting to them. As people do it by the





agreement they have no rights to change the government (the desire to change it might be





derived from the people’s natural state to be at war). The only time when people can change





the government is when the government does not protect them any longer, which was actually





the reason for why they entered the society. Under Hobbes theory, people enter the society





for the reason that, as they all feel vulnerable at the state of war, they wish to get together to





be in peace. Thus, the role of government is in any way protecting their feeling of security





even if it comes to war.





Contrary to Thomas Hobbes, John Locke’s belief is that men in its nature are independent and equal. Locke states that what makes us behave in civilized way is that people are governed by the reason. John Locke in his theory shows that the civilization is independent from the government and that fundamental rights, the rights that are not derived by the government regulations, exist independent from the sovereign.





The natural rights, for instance freedom of speech, proprietary rights, etc, are God-given rights that people have since they are born. Therefore, the reason for why people enter the society is to get their natural rights protected. As John Locke says in his work, the state of nature of the men is the state of the freedom to made any action and order their possessions in what ever way they like and want it to be and that freedom should not be intervened by any other person. According to Locke, the state of nature lacks impartial judges, precise laws and sufficient power to uphold moral laws, protecting people and their natural rights. Thus, a democratic government is needed, so that the elected government can only rule by consent with the ruled people and there is no need that the government should have total power over the people. The government is formed with the basic purpose to serve the rights of the common good of the people, that is to protect the rights of the subjects and to represent the will of the majority. John Locke states that people have the right to disobey the ruler’s order or regulations if illegal actions are mad towards their freedom and independence and they can change the ruler by establishing new legislation for their safety and security. The theory of John Locke seems to be more reasonable, because people do tend to act freely (let’s take the will of people to get promotion at work and do the job independently) and think that they are free from any other person.


As a result, any kind of authority brings limits to the independence and freedom of the





ruled people. Both thinkers had described this issue in their theories. Therefore, in a time of





war and crisis, such the September 11, 001 attack, Hobbes’ position will be that in a critical





period, whereby the national security of the country is the primary goal of the government,





any necessary steps to pertain the safety are admissible and justified. Hobbes reply to the





terrorists would be that the government should by any means protect the





security of the people living in the community.














But that’s mean, that for the sake of security, the individual rights are overlap when the





government takes precautions that would also encroach upon the freedom of the individuals





living in society. As we can look right now how the debate in United States goes between





security and civil rights, we can see how the Hobbesian viewpoint has been adopted. People





who are suspected of terrorism are arrested without to file charges against them and or even





much worse, a non-citizen civil person can be tried in military tribunals. Locke, in contrary,





would sustain the need of liberty and civil rights, even though government resides in time of





war. In this time of insecurity, the role of government is by any means to protect the society,





but the necessary security measures should be in such a respect that it does not hinder the





people from their natural rights.





In consequence, Locke’s position on liberty rights is more consistent because it





protects the individual rights and the Hobbesian position on security is not justified when it





neglects and disadvantages the liberty of the people. Wartime sacrifices civil liberties, but is





important to see in which mass. The “war on terrorism” is not likely to be a temporary





situation of war. The decisions that the government takes in that time restricts everybody in





his liberty, so that a Lockean position would be more adequate.























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The politics of “The Bell Jar”: the heroine’s madness and her social world.

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It could be said of Sylvia Plath’s only novel “The Bell Jar” that it attempts to place responsibility for Esther’s breakdown on the social pressures and conventions of the 150s, or at least relates the breakdown to the times. Esther’s observations of her social world contribute to her emotional downfall. Chapter Six of the novel does particularly well in describing her restricted and patriarchal social world, and her confusion concerning her role in it.


Esther’s disillusionment with her adult world is portrayed especially well in Chapter Six of the novel. This chapter works much like the rest of the novel does � through the process of juxtaposition. The two main scenes, a birth and the discovery that Buddy is not a virgin, contrast greatly. The first event is not personally connected to Esther, but has an effect on her, and the second event is much more personal and is actually inside Esther’s world, yet her disappointment in both links the two disparate experiences. This chapter highlights Esther’s patriarchal social world � men have the authority, and consider themselves just slightly superior. This chapter also shows how Esther involuntarily lets herself be dominated in most situations, and her lack of control in such circumstances.


Esther meets a fat medical student who sneers, ”At least your mother loves you” (67) at her. This is a hostile introduction to the hospital and to the chapter. Guided by Buddy into the hospital, she encounters this display of dominance. The subtext seems to say that this is not a woman’s territory � she is a stranger in a foreign land, or at least is regarded so by the male students. She has been thinking about how a woman would kiss someone like this man, and because of her dreaminess, misses a retort to this insult. Her lack of command and failure to stand up for herself renders her a little inadequate and weak, at least in the eyes of those around her, i.e. the males.





From the beginning of the novel, many of Esther’s little illusions are shattered. Few are related more strikingly than when she watches a woman give birth in hospital. Esther has vividly imagined herself giving birth, and feels “the most important thing…was actually seeing the baby come out of you yourself and making sure it was yours.” (70). Her dreams of her first baby starkly contrast the reality of a drugged woman making an “unhuman whooing noise” on what looks like an “awful torture table”(6). This is a disappointment to Esther � an instance where she discovers her social world is uglier than she has believed previously. Esther is made even more confused in her role as a woman by viewing a birth which is very different to her own ideals. If she chose a family over a career, she states that she would want to see the baby straight away. Instead, she sees what she perceives as a strange, clinical, dehumanised and vaguely cruel scene. Esther thinks the drug is something a man must have thought up, to trick women out of remembering the pain of childbirth, yet still having to go through it. This adds to her conscious or subconscious distrust of men.


This chapter takes place on one of their weekends that she and Buddy take. Esther says, “He always arranged our week-ends so we’d never regret wasting our time in any way.”(71) As usual this weekend has a plan, which Esther is to follow. Once again, Esther has little control over her circumstances. Buddy, to try and help himself understand what is most important to her, schedules her poetry readings. They are somewhat incompatible people, but their families and society are putting pressure on them to get along.


Later on, it is Buddy who initiates another disappointing scene. He shows himself to her, again in a clinical, awkward way. He suggest it to her, by saying, “…don’t you think you would like to see me?” (71)


This proposal triggers Esther’s recollections of her mother and grandmother hinting that Buddy was a “fine, clean boy” and was someone to “stay fine and clean for”(7). Her female family members have already subtly pushed ideas of marriage on Esther, strengthening the pull in Esther’s mind between family and career. These hints are society’s intentions. The ideals of Esther’s world are purity and family.


This emphasis on staying “clean” only serves to intensify the betrayal that Esther believes Buddy to have committed. His admission to not being a virgin cracks open the ideals that Esther has been taught and has believed in. She is taken aback by Buddy’s confession, and angry. In her mind he has been duplicitous and dishonest. She becomes disillusioned in one of the few males she is close to. This letdown is one of the many factors that lead, from her confusion in her social world, to her eventual breakdown. She now finds a double standard between genders regarding sex, and the male has the upper hand. Buddy’s mother places great emphasis on virginity � “for men and women both”. “What a man wants is a mate and what a woman wants is infinite security”(75). Buddy would rebuff any argument of Esther’s by saying that his mother “still got pleasure out of his father…it must mean she really knew what was what.” Buddy is a believer in the traditional patriarchal society where men and women have their separate and confined roles. He repeatedly attempts to instil this docility in Esther, at a point in her life and mind where she is struggling to come to terms with the choices she faces in her adult social world.


Esther uses further evidence of Buddy’s hypocrisy to strengthen her case of disillusionment. AS well as his fa├žade of purity and cleanliness, he is very proud of his perfect health. He tells Esther her sinus troubles are psychosomatic, which she thinks is an “odd attitude for a doctor to have” (76), and then later on contracts tuberculosis. Although this ‘hypocrisy’ is involuntary, Esther holds it against him, as his illness prevents her from breaking up with him. This situation is yet another where Esther’s control of a situation is taken away from her.


Esther’s reaction to Buddy’s illness is a little strange. “I told Buddy how sorry I was about the TB and promised to write, but when I hung up I didn’t feel one bit sorry. I only felt a wonderful relief.” (76) She reasons that his illness is a punishment for Buddy’s “double life” and apparent superiority complex. Coloured by her feelings of betrayal, she interprets this event in an irrational way. She goes on to think “how convenient it would be now [she] didn’t have to announce to everybody at college [she] had broken off with Buddy and start the boring business of blind dates again.” (77) The pressures of her social world at college would force an unattached Esther to go out on dates. Esther relishes the freedom of an absent boyfriend, while still having the security of being attached. This somewhat off-centre logic of Esther’s gives an early hint of the breakdown to come.


This chapter highlights the lack of romance in Esther’s social world. She has dreams, poetic ideas of how things should happen, and she is let down by what appears to be the society’s norm a more unromantic, almost clinical, patriarchal outlook on human interaction. Plath illustrates the growing disillusionment that a young woman faces when coming to terms with the adult world and her loss of innocence in 150s America. The rusty and jarring progression of social values from a patriarchal structure {especially those pertaining to women} happening in the 50s, and continuing to the 60s and beyond, takes its toll on Esther. She is part of a new era, but this upheaval is invisible to her. The old and the new both tug at her, and she does not have the awareness or understanding to look outside her position and relate it to society in order to save herself.





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Great Gatesby

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Although the precise date of many of Shakespeare’s plays is in doubt, his dramatic career is generally divided into four periods (1) the period up to 154, () the years from 154 to 1600, () the years from 1600 to 1608, and (4) the period after 1608. Because of the difficulty of dating Shakespeare’s plays and the lack of conclusive facts about his writings, these dates are approximate and can be used only as a convenient framework in which to discuss his development. In all periods, the plots of his plays were frequently drawn from chronicles, histories, or earlier fiction, as were the plays of other contemporary dramatists.


First Period


Shakespeare’s first period was one of experimentation. His early plays, unlike his more mature work, are characterized to a degree by formal and rather obvious construction and by stylized verse.


Chronicle history plays were a popular genre of the time, and four plays dramatizing the English civil strife of the 15th century are possibly Shakespeare’s earliest dramatic works (see England The Lancastrian and Yorkist Kings). These plays, Henry VI, Parts I, II, and III (150?-15?) and Richard III (15?), deal with evil resulting from weak leadership and from national disunity fostered for selfish ends. The four-play cycle closes with the death of Richard III and the ascent to the throne of Henry VII, the founder of the Tudor dynasty, to which Elizabeth belonged. In style and structure, these plays are related partly to medieval drama and partly to the works of earlier Elizabethan dramatists, especially Christopher Marlowe. Either indirectly (through such dramatists) or directly, the influence of the classical Roman dramatist Seneca is also reflected in the organization of these four plays, especially in the bloodiness of many of their scenes and in their highly colored, bombastic language. The influence of Seneca, exerted by way of the earlier English dramatist Thomas Kyd, is particularly obvious in Titus Andronicus (154?), a tragedy of righteous revenge for heinous and bloody acts, which are staged in sensational detail.





Shakespeare’s comedies of the first period represent a wide range. The Comedy of Errors (15?), a farce in imitation of classical Roman comedy, depends for its appeal on mistaken identities in two sets of twins involved in romance and war. Farce is not as strongly emphasized in The Taming of the Shrew (15?), a comedy of character. The Two Gentlemen of Verona (154?) concerns romantic love. Love’s Labour’s Lost (154?) satirizes the loves of its main male characters as well as the fashionable devotion to studious pursuits by which these noblemen had first sought to avoid romantic and worldly ensnarement. The dialogue in which many of the characters voice their pretensions ridicules the artificially ornate, courtly style typified by the works of English novelist and dramatist John Lyly, the court conventions of the time, and perhaps the scientific discussions of Sir Walter Raleigh and his colleagues.


Second Period


Shakespeare’s second period includes his most important plays concerned with English history, his so-called joyous comedies, and two of his major tragedies. In this period, his style and approach became highly individualized. The second-period historical plays include Richard II (155?), Henry IV, Parts I and II (157?), and Henry V (158?). They encompass the years immediately before those portrayed in the Henry VI plays. Richard II is a study of a weak, sensitive, self-dramatizing but sympathetic monarch who loses his kingdom to his forceful successor, Henry IV. In the two parts of Henry IV, Henry recognizes his own guilt. His fears for his own son, later Henry V, prove unfounded, as the young prince displays a responsible attitude toward the duties of kingship. In an alternation of masterful comic and serious scenes, the fat knight Falstaff and the rebel Hotspur reveal contrasting excesses between which the prince finds his proper position.


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